The History of Metal Diecast Toys

Diecast (or die cast or die-cast) was first made in the early 20th century by factories such as Meccano (Dinky Toys) in England and Dawst Brothers (Tootsie Toys) in the United States. The first model on the market is very basic in the form of a small car or van without interior. At that time the manufacturing was still not very good, so many were easily cracked and damaged. As a result, die cast produced before World War II is rarely found in good condition.

Lesney began making die cast toys in 1947, popularly known as Matchbox. This toy then became very popular which is widely used as a die cast toy car, regardless of who the original factory was.

The popularity of die cast toys grew in the 1950s where details and quality were enhanced. As a result, many companies are involved in this field, including the Corgi brand produced by Mettoy, which in 1956 was a pioneer in the use of interiors and windows made of clear plastic in its models.

In 1968, Hot Wheels were introduced in the United States by Mattel to answer complaints that they did not have toy products for boys that could compensate for Barbie doll toys for girls. Hot Wheels are seen as fast toy cars because Hot Wheels are equipped with wheels that have low friction. Hot Wheels quickly gained an important position in the die cast toy market, becoming one of the top sellers in the world and challenging the popularity of Matchbox.

During the 1960s many companies used die cast toys as a means of promoting their advertisements. In the 1980s it was apparent that many die cast vehicles were bought by adults as collections, and not as children’s toys. Companies like McDonald’s, Sears Roebuck, Kodak and Texaco ordered toy makers to produce toy models that display their names and logos, or the licenses they use. One example is the American Airlines London Bus produced by Matchbox, the idea was then quickly copied by many other airlines.

Despite its popularity, many die cast factories competed in the 1980s. Meccano (Dinky), Corgi and Matchbox went bankrupt over a period of three years later, which was basically influenced by the economic climate in Britain at the time. It is not possible to produce it in the UK in order to compete in the world market. Mattel then moved most of its production from the United States to Asia. Matchbox was bought by a Hong Kong tycoon Universal Holdings who then moved it from England to Macau. Then in 1997, Mattel bought Matchbox. Which then makes Hot Wheels and Matchbox a twin sister brand. The two brands continue to sell under separate names.

The first diecast (or die-cast or die-cast) toys were made in the early 20th century by factories such as Meccano (Dinky Toys) in England and Dawst Brothers (Tootsie Toys) in the United States. The first model on the market is very basic in the form of a small car or van without interior. At that time the manufacturing was still not very good, so many were easily cracked and damaged. As a result, die cast produced before World War II is rarely found in good condition.

Lesnay began making die cast toys in 1947, popularly known as Matchbox. This toy then became very popular which is widely used as a die cast toy car, regardless of who the original factory was.

The popularity of die cast toys grew in the 1950s where details and quality were enhanced. As a result, many companies are involved in this field, including the Corgi brand produced by Mettoy, which in 1956 was a pioneer in the use of interiors and windows made of clear plastic in its models.

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In 1968, Hot Wheels were introduced in the United States by Mattel to answer complaints that they did not have toy products for boys that could compensate for Barbie doll toys for girls. Hot Wheels are seen as fast toy cars because Hot Wheels are equipped with wheels that have low friction. Hot Wheels quickly gained an important position in the die cast toy market, becoming one of the top sellers in the world and challenging the popularity of Matchbox.

During the 1960s many companies used die cast toys as a means of promoting their advertisements. In the 1980s it was apparent that many die cast vehicles were bought by adults as collections, and not as children’s toys. Companies like McDonald’s, Sears Roebuck, Kodak and Texaco ordered toy makers to produce toy models that display their names and logos, or the licenses they use. One example is American Airlines London Bus, produced by Match.

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